Kristin J. Homan

Associate Professor of Psychology
All FacultyPsychology

Contact Information
Phone: 724-458-2043
Email: kjhoman@gcc.edu

Kristin J. Homan

What is your educational background?

  • Ph.D., Psychology, University of Minnesota, 1991
  • B.S., Psychology, University of Wisconsin, 1983

What are the main focuses of your research?

I’m currently working on a project that explores the connection between self-compassion (defined as treating oneself with understanding and kindness), perceived stress, and health. Other interests include attachment, body image, and eudaimonic well-being.

What specific courses or specialties do you teach?

I enjoy teaching our advanced research course, which is unlike most lecture-based courses. In advanced research methods, I mentor our students as they develop their own research project from start to finish. I always end up learning a great deal as they explore different areas of psychology.

Selected Publications

  • “Don’t bring me down: Effects of priming secure and anxious attachment on body image." Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. In press, 2017.
  • "Secure attachment, eudaimonic well-being, and self-compassion in late adulthood." Aging and Mental Health. In press, 2016.
  • "Factor structure and psychometric properties of a state version of the Body Appreciation Scale-2." Body Image, 2016.
  • "Self-compassion and psychological well-being in older adults." Journal of Adult Development, 2016.
  • "Perceived relationship with God moderates the relationship between social comparison and body appreciation." Mental Health, Religion, & Culture, 2015.
  • "Exercise motives and positive body image in physically active college women and men: Exploring an expanded acceptance model of intuitive eating." Body Image, 2015.
  • "Self-compassion moderates body comparison and appearance self-worth’s inverse relationships with body appreciation." Body Image, 2015.
  • "A mediation model linking attachment to God, self-compassion, and mental health." Mental Health, Religion, & Culture, 2014.
  • "Gratitude buffers the adverse effect of viewing the thin ideal on body dissatisfaction." Body Image: An International Journal, 2014.

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